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Archive for the ‘case studies’ Category

Poynter Institute posts detailed case study of Rutland Herald’s use of Clickshare

Posted on: September 4th, 2013 by wdensmore No Comments

The Poynter Institute has posted a detailed case study on use by the family-owned Rutland Herald, Barre-Times Argus and related publications of Clickshare’s user-authentication, site-access control, and metered-access services. The article emphasizes the flexiblity of the service in a market where the Mitchell family competes with high-quality, free websites. It includes details of financial and traffic numbers.

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Two case studies: Metered, multiplatform subscriptions using Clickshare

Posted on: February 12th, 2012 by wdensmore No Comments

Two New England dailies provide case studies of how they are adding revenue after adding systems for metered subscription access to their websites in this recording of a New England Newspaper & Press Association (NENPA) panel. The Feb. 11, 2012 session in Boston opens with Richard Lerner, CEO of Clickshare Service Corp., and continues with John Winn Miller, publisher of the Concord (N.H.) Monitor and Gary Farrugia, CEO and publisher of The Day, of New London, Conn.   Download the MP3 podcast to listen to the discussion and follow along with the presentation links below, courtesy of NENPA. (70MB, 1 hour, 12 mins.) Farrugia’s presentation broadly covers the paper’s strategy for becoming a digital-data media service for the region’s businesses and citizens.

New London [Conn.] Day launches Clickshare-powered multiplatform subscription service with “passport” to discounts

Posted on: September 14th, 2011 by Bill Densmore No Comments

The Day, of New London, Conn.,  went live with a multi-platform print and digital subscription service and membership program powered by Clickshare Service Corp. The new membership program offers unlimited access to its website, theday.com, including its premium online and mobile content.

“We take great pride in the quality journalism we provide to the communities we serve. We’ve spent nearly a decade building and establishing theday.com as a brand. That’s what is driving us to put a price on our growing digital platform,” said Gary Farrugia, The Day’s publisher.

The membership program, which ranges in price per month from $9.99 to $22.99 for top-of-the-line Platinum service, will begin on Wednesday, September 14. Current home delivery subscribers to The Day are automatically members in the new program once they complete their registration at theday.com. Non-member visitors to theday.com will be allowed up to 10 “premium” staff-written articles or features each month. Only members will be allowed commenting privileges on stories at theday.com.

As part of the new membership model, The Day also introduced a new members-only rewards program, The Day Passport, which includes rewards, events, and giveaways to local businesses, entertainment venues, and cultural institutions.

“We are shifting from an address-based print subscription model to a user-based content access model, whereby those who join will enjoy our award-winning products in all the forms that we publish them, as well as additional benefits and privileges,” said Daniel L. Williams, Director of Audience Development.

The Day’s introduction was covered by News & Technology  and by Poynter.com.

Emedia Vitals post recounts Concord Monitor “metered” experience

Posted on: September 2nd, 2011 by Bill Densmore No Comments

Writer Ellie Behling of the website emedia vitals posted a wrapup describing how four different U.S. dailies are using metered-access subscription systems on their websites. One of them featured in the Aug. 30, 2011 post was the Concord (N.H.) Monitor, a Clickshare client.


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Quoting from the post:

“John Winn Miller, publisher of The Concord Monitor, which launched a metered paywall in May, also found it was important to look for the best practices from what other papers wrere doing and be rigorous about having data for every opinion.

“It might sound obvious, but it can’t be overlooked: Publishers have to offer readers something worth paying for before they even think about putting up a paywall.

“The Concord Monitor, for instance, rolled out a complete redesign of its website shortly before the paywall, focusing on a more usable design and better local content. The paper also only puts local copy behind the paywall, since readers can’t get that type of content elsewhere.

“Miller noted that he was initially wary about reader acceptance of a paywall; after all, the statewide newspaper the Monitor competes with isn’t behind a paywall. ‘Typically if you’re in a competitive market you’re afraid to do anything,’ he said. Largely because of the newspaper’s research and preparation, the Monitor went forward with the paywall and the newspaper is enjoying a year-over-year online revenue boost.

Reports from the front: Three mid-sized papers describe their experience

Posted on: May 29th, 2011 by wdensmore No Comments

COLUMBIA, Mo. — Executives of three mid-sized papers offered field reports on charging for online content during a session at the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute (RJI) at the Missouri School of Journalism. The April 26, 2011 session — involving papers in Missouri, Georgia and Oklahoma — is now archived as a video stream at the RJI website. In addition, Nieman Lab blog reporter Justin Ellis was in Columbia for the sessions and he’s written a summary, with links.  The video is on a page with more than 15 other video frames. Click on the main page, then scroll down to the No. 11 frame to launch and watch the session, entitled: “Reports from the Field on Paid Content.”
The papers covered are the Columbia [Mo.] Tribune, the Augusta [Ga.] Chronicle, and the Tulsa [Okla.] World.

CASE STUDY:
Clickshare’s multiplatform, free/paid metered ‘paywall’ puts two Vermont dailies ahead of subscription plan

Posted on: February 4th, 2011 by wdensmore 1 Comment

By Bill Densmore

RUTLAND, Vt., Feb. 4, 2011 — Converting a formerly free news website to hybrid free and subscription service is judged an early success by the family owner of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times Argus — and the ability of Clickshare to offer user-friendly, multi-platform registration, subscription, billing and access control is a key reason.

Paid online subscribers are above projections and reached the high-end of industry norms in less than four months, says Rob Mitchell, state editor of the combined-20,000-circulation dailies and the third-generation in the Mitchell’s family ownership of the two papers.

“As a subscription engine it’s worked out very well because it technically works very well,” Mitchell says of Clickshare.

Clickshare’s solution went live for the family’s customers on Oct. 1, and since then a total of 28,200 people have registered online for free, including readers from the Mitchell family’s four monthly regional business magazines (circulation about 40,000). “Some of them we would not have been able to connect with if it weren’t for this system,” says Mitchell, who heads the family’s online and mobile news delivery efforts.

Clickshare manages a single database for the papers and for four monthly business magazines operated by the Mitchell family as Vermont Community Media. The Clickshare technology handles one-account, one-ID, one-bill authentication and login of print subscribers and users on the web, mobile and soon-to-launch tablet applications. So readers and users can manage all access and billing from a single account.

“The business monthlies had never been integrated with our daily subscriptions,” says Mitchell. “Now they are, and this produces more activity for them online, and we can also market across all platforms.” In addition, the single sign on, single-account solution means Mitchell will be able to offer a variety of multiplatform subscription packages and bundles.

The family is following the emerging practice of a hybrid free-paid approach on the web.

Of the 28,200 registered users, about 7,500 are existing subscribers to the print dailies, who signed up to get free access to the newspaper’s web site. The other registrants have signed up for one of a variety of online and print packages, which may include some or all of the print newspaper, the web site, a new online e-Edition, and the mobile site.

Paid online subscribers are above projections, said Mitchell. He said his father, Publisher R. John Mitchell, had figured online paid subscribers would settle at around 2-3 percent of print circulation after a year. The actual number tracked after a little more than four months as 950 – already at 4.7 percent.

“My father surveyed the prices people were charging across the country and we basically took our print price and gave probably a 30-percent discount off that to make it attractive both to people who had discontinued their print subscription and to new subscribers,” says Mitchell.

The online annual subscription works out to $2.99 a week, says Mitchell. The minimum subscription length online – a month – works out to about $3.50 a week. A day pass – which Clickshare’s technology supports – is a dollar.

Mitchell says they’ll have to do some survey work to see how many of the 600 paying subscribers online are former print subscribers – they don’t know that yet. “A significant portion of them are either outside our print-delivery area or out of state,” says Mitchell. “That’s encouraging.”

As for print circulation and web advertising, Mitchell says: “We’re doing well. I think the paywall is helping us. I think we’ve benefited by being willing to take this step.” Mitchell thinks online advertisers will view registered and paid subscribers as more valuable than casual surfers. And, after three months of decline in web traffic – page views and daily visitors – the traffic trended back up in January, and showed an increase in online reader engagement.

“We will continue to market our online content as worth paying for, and do the newsgathering that will back up that promise,” Mitchell said. “And many of our readers have told us they are confident and happy that we are building a business model that will sustain our journalism well into the future.”